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Will Electronic Stability Control Be Required for Trucks? A Sarasota Injury Lawyer Explains


Posted on Jun 02, 2012

Government research has shown that the deadliest type of accident is a rollover crash. This is why the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) aimed their new proposal at preventing rollover accidents in large trucks and busses. The new proposal, announced Wednesday, May 16, 2012, would require electronic stability control to be equipped in new trucks and buses.

 

This safety system would help prevent a rollover accident in Sarasota and throughout this nation through computer-controlled braking that works by sensing when a driver might lose control of the vehicle. If the system senses this, it will automatically apply the brakes to individual wheels to keep the large vehicle stable and avoid a rollover.

 

In order for this to occur, it would require manufacturers to install these safety systems in large commercial trucks and buses, including motor coaches. NHTSA estimates that this technology would help:

 

  • Prevent 14% of loss-of-control crashes each year
  • Avoid approximately 56% of rollover accidents annually
  • Prevent 2,329 accidents each year
  • Avoid 649 to 858 injuries annually
  • Prevent 49 to 60 fatalities per year

 

Cars are already required to be equipped with this safety system technology, but busses and large trucks are currently not obligated to abide by this. The new proposal would change this and require this technology on large busses and trucks to help reduce rollover accidents, injuries and fatalities.

 

Our Sarasota injury lawyers at the Mallard Law Firm welcome the proposal, as this stability-enhancing technology would help keep motorists safer on the roads.

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