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The Secret’s Out: Florida Might Not Be the Best State for Elderly Care

It’s no secret that Florida is popular among retirees. In fact, our state has the densest concentration of seniors in the nation. While the nice weather may be an incentive to move to the Sunshine State, low taxes and cost of living are what attract the elderly to move here.

Although Florida is known by many in this country as the retirement mecca, it might not be the best place for elderly people to move. While retirees can live on their own for quite some time, eventually—as they continue to age—they may need to move into an assisted living facility or nursing home to receive the health care they need.

However, if too many seniors move here, there could be a concern of nursing home shortages or overcrowded nursing homes. If nursing homes have too many patients, will those seniors receive the appropriate level of care? Unfortunately, some nursing homes are understaffed and overcrowded—unable to provide quality care to someone’s mom, dad, grandma or grandpa.

This concern is coming at a time when elder abuse is already on the rise. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over half a million seniors age 60 and older were predicted to experience some form of abuse in 2013. Sadly, elder abuse in a nursing home can include any of the following examples:

  • Financial abuse – This type of abuse is often the biggest crime against the elderly that includes taking their money or property.
  • Emotional abuse – This type of abuse occurs when a caregiver yells, calls names, threatens, or belittles an elderly patient.
  • Neglect – When caregivers fail to provide the appropriate level of care to their patients, the elderly may suffer from malnutrition, dehydration, bed sores, and ulcers.
  • Physical abuse – This type of abuse occurs in the form of hitting, pinching, burning, or causing any other bodily harm to a person. Broken bones and other unexplained injuries are often signs of physical abuse.
  • Sexual abuse – An elderly person may be sexually abused in a nursing home by workers or other residents. When someone is forced into a sexual act against their own will, it is considered sexual abuse.

It is important to spread the word about elder abuse so that no one mistreats someone’s mom, dad, grandma, or grandpa. Do your part to lessen elder abuse in nursing homes by sharing this article on Facebook with your friends and family.